Lincoln Place

Lincoln Place

Lincoln Place, a neighborhood in the southeastern corner of the City of Pittsburgh, was originally a 106 acre farm named Stoney Farm, owned by John Means.  In 1898 he sold the farm to Edwin Hazlett.  The farm was sold off to many settlers looking for a place to live in the hills of Western Pennsylvania.  The area grew sporadically.  Water lines and natural gas as utilities were provided in the late 1800s, and the neighborhood began to take shape.  Electricity for homes and street lamps were introduced in the 1920’s.

As the neighborhood grew, the railways entered.  In 1870 the Pittsburgh, Virginia and Charleston Railroad provided a means of transportation for goods, services and people.  Around 1900, there were a few trolley lines from Pittsburgh out to Lincoln Place, such as the Homestead and Mifflin Street Railways.  Through the 1930’s streetcar lines were built in the other communities.

Originally the area was part of Mifflin Township, but the growth and advancement, and ties to Pittsburgh led to it’s annexation into the city in 1929.  Upon this annexation, the area began to grow faster and became an active and busy community.  Schools, businesses and mail services sprung up to service the residents of this growing Pittsburgh neighborhood.

Today, Lincoln Place is home to suburban living in the city.  Classic communities and new construction are mixed with the surrounding woods and green spaces.  It is known as a quiet and growing community.

Lincoln Place
Lincoln Place
Lincoln Place
Lincoln Place
Lincoln Place
Lincoln Place

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